Chinese New Year Tag

For many of us, we are happy to say good-bye to 2019 for a number of reasons----illness, disappointments, betrayals, losses. Of course, these occurrences happen every year, but there seemed to be a heaviness specific to the Year of the Pig. For some, it’s a relief...

Preparing your kitchen - and your life - for the New Year One of the most popular gods in Chinese culture is Zao Jun, the Kitchen God. The story goes that Zao Jun was assigned by the emperor of heaven to watch over families and take...

Lao Tzu said, “New beginnings are often disguised as painful endings.” For many of us, the Year of the Monkey can be done already. But rather than shaking off the monkey pranks of this past 12 months, perhaps we could look at how they’re defining the upcoming...

The Chinese New Year begins on the second new moon after winter solstice—this year that date is February 8. If you celebrated the western New Year, this could be a time for you to recommit to or revise your resolutions for 2016. The Chinese put as...

As we embark upon the start of 2016, many of us are in forward-looking state of mind. This is the time to set goals for the year ahead – and I encourage you to do so. As you set your 2016 goals: Make them SMART -...

The Chinese calendar is comprised of a 12-year cycle with each year assigned an animal. There are a few stories of how these exact animals were selected. One of the legends says that Buddha summoned all of the animals of the earth to come visit...

The format of the Chinese calendar is comprised of two components:  an animal and an element from the 5 Chinese Element system. Each year there’s a new animal and every other year a new Element.The year 2014 is symbolized by the Horse and by Wood....

Many of us are grateful that the Dragon year is over.  Although exciting, it wasn’t without its moments of frenzy and upheaval.  The Snake energy arrives according to the Chinese solar calendar on February 4th and according to the lunar calendar on February 10th. The year...